Home Modification

Five practical and affordable DIY tips to make your house more accessible

posted on July 14, 2015 - 3:12pm
From navigating tight bathroom spaces to working your way through a long hallway, homes can present many challenges when it comes to mobility and accessibility for those with neuromuscular disease.  Making large-scale modifications is always an option, but with the cost of renovations, it’s worth pursuing budget-friendly strategies first, says Amber Ward, occupational therapy coordinator at...

News and updates from the MDA community

posted on July 14, 2015 - 3:05pm
Quest Summer 2015
Uniting Today for A Better Tomorrow: Building on the telethon’s rich history to achieve new ways to reach and connect families

Ramps are expensive but worth it for the independence and safety they provide, says a man who details his experiences with having a ramp built for his wife

posted on July 1, 2013 - 9:11am
Quest Vol. 20, No. 3
When my wife got her TiLite manual wheelchair, it opened up a world of freedom for her. Her back pain was gone, along with her risk of falling, and she could move longer distances. Suddenly, she could again move across the shopping mall, maneuver around the house and perform at her job. While the wheelchair gave her more freedom inside and outside the house, it introduced a new challenge: getting...

Getting on the level

posted on April 9, 2012 - 12:04pm
QUEST Vol. 19, No. 2
Whether facing a 2-inch-high curb or a 3-foot-tall porch, the results for a person in a wheelchair can be exactly the same: no passage. The way around both these barriers is, of course, a wheelchair ramp, though they will be decidedly different. The first might be a portable, foldable aluminum device, while the second might be a large, permanent structure made of concrete or galvanized steel....
posted on April 9, 2012 - 12:00pm
QUEST Vol. 19, No. 2
To contact these or other ramp manufacturers, see Wheelchair Ramp Resources below. TJ Rampit USA

Long used in Europe and Asia, these personal hygiene fixtures are being adopted in the US by people who need help using the bathroom

posted on March 31, 2011 - 11:55am
QUEST Vol. 18, No. 2
A few years ago, Bonnie Guzelf of Phoenix began having difficulty using the bathroom by herself. Guzelf, who has a slowly progressive form of ALS (amyotrophic lateral sclerosis), found that her hands, arms and legs were getting too weak to perform basic hygiene. A friend who is an occupational therapist suggested she get a bidet.

A state rehabilitation program remodeled my bathroom — and my life

posted on March 31, 2011 - 11:44am
QUEST Vol. 18, No. 2
I never thought I would be so excited about getting a new toilet, sink and shower. But my new fully wheelchair-accessible bathroom has made such a difference in my life, my attitude and my outlook that I can truly say this makeover has been a life-changing event. More than 10 years ago, I received a diagnosis of ALS (amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or Lou Gehrig’s disease). Over the years, I’ve...
posted on March 31, 2011 - 10:40am
QUEST Vol. 18, No. 2
Aqueduck faucet extender Designed for kids, this quick-and-easy fix also can enable people in wheelchairs to better access the faucet. The extender simply slips over the existing faucet and funnels the water closer to the user. $17.98 on Amazon.com. Peachy, (888) 498-0488.