Safety

posted on September 1, 2007 - 11:54am
QUEST Vol. 14, No. 5
Three times I broke my right foot. Three times in the same place — directly below my big toe. Strangers would ask why I was on crutches and wearing a cast, and I concocted elaborate stories to explain my temporary impairment. “Skiing, over the holidays,” I’d say. “Car accident. The vehicle was totaled so a broken foot is a minor inconvenience.” “Dancing. My partner has two left feet.”
posted on November 1, 2008 - 10:21am
QUEST Vol. 15, No. 6
It was 5 o’clock on a weekday afternoon. I was sitting on the corner of Montrose, a five-lane thoroughfare through downtown Houston, and Sul Ross, a little cross street between West Alabama and Richmond. The class I was taking at the University of St. Thomas had ended for the day, and I was waiting for my faithfully late METRO bus.

Those teeth were made for brushing

posted on December 1, 2002 - 6:02am
Dr. John R. Large of Tucson, Ariz., chats with Matt Messmer. At the Tucson, Ariz., home of Matt and Terra Messmer, the day starts at 4 a.m.
posted on July 1, 2010 - 11:07am
QUEST Vol. 17, No. 3
After 25 years of marriage, my husband, the man who vowed to love me forever, dumped me on Fifth Avenue in New York. I was riding in a manual wheelchair and Jim was pushing me. The light turned green and he shoved my chair into the crosswalk. In an instant, I tumbled headfirst into the intersection and landed in the street. Before the light changed, several people picked me up and plopped me back...

A variety of devices make independence a little safer for people with disabilities

posted on July 1, 2010 - 11:31am
QUEST Vol. 17, No. 3
People with disabilities are more apt than the general population to encounter situations in which they need help, whether it’s emergency medical treatment or simply assistance getting from one location to another in the house. Fortunately, several devices and services are available to help out in these circumstances. Cell phones It’s logical that cell phones, given their presence nearly...

From an evacuation to a power outage to a simple family emergency — do you have a plan that accommodates your special needs?

posted on September 3, 2010 - 10:43am
As storm season whips up, it’s wise to take stock of your emergency plan, especially if your mobility is limited. Two veterans of weather emergencies — Barbara Twardowski of Mandeville, La. (who has Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease and uses a power chair) and Shelley Obrand of Davie, Fla. (who has a nonspecific form of muscular dystrophy and uses a power chair and respiratory assistance device) —...

When a 1,000-year storm hit Nashville, a writer with muscular dystrophy learned the truth of the adage ‘it’s all about neighbors helping neighbors’

posted on January 1, 2011 - 4:28pm
QUEST Vol. 18, No. 1
Devastating. Humbling. Unifying. Frightening. Those are words that echoed through Nashville on the weekend of May 1, 2010, when the area was hit by a storm of Biblical proportions — a storm that would ultimately change the face of this beautiful city. Although I’ve written in the past about disaster preparation for Quest readers, there is nothing like firsthand experience. Here, then, is my story...
posted on December 1, 1999 - 5:00pm
In the spring of 1997, Leslie Little was preparing to speak at a forum about home and fire safety for people with disabilities. She wanted to include a demonstration of a fire extinguisher that was adapted for use by people with disabilities. Problem was, such a device didn't exist.

A new federal program provides personal care aides for individuals with disabilities stranded in emergency shelters during a declared disaster

posted on August 13, 2012 - 6:00am
Wildfires, windstorms and floods have been in the news regularly this year. What if such a disaster suddenly hit your neighborhood? Would you be prepared?  Planning ahead for emergency situations is especially important for people who have disabilities that affect mobility and self-care. You are in the best position to plan for your own safety and well-being since you know your functional...

Taking more than care

posted on January 9, 2014 - 9:23am
Quest Winter 2014
Without the help of my paid caregivers, I can’t get out of bed. I put my life in their hands every day, and that’s why it was such a slap in the face when one of my aides stole my work laptop. It’s been well-documented that individuals with disabilities are victimized by crime, including burglary/theft, at much higher rates than the rest of the population. In fact, we’re often targeted...