Learning Disabilities

posted on March 31, 2010 - 5:32pm
QUEST Vol. 17, No. 2
Bookshare, the world’s largest online library of accessible books and periodicals, is free for students with qualified “print disabilities,” which include difficulty holding a book or turning pages. Bookshare offers more than 60,000 books, textbooks and teacher-recommended reading in accessible formats.
posted on March 31, 2010 - 10:20pm
QUEST Vol. 17, No. 2
Jacob Gapko has compiled the first-ever bibliography of books about young people with muscular dystrophy, with help from a Carnegie-Whitney Award from the American Library Association. Click on the title to access the bibliography: Children and Young Adults with Muscular Dystrophy: An Annotated Bibliography
posted on February 1, 2001 - 3:10pm
"People always think speech therapy is related to speech and not to assistive technology or swallowing disorders," says Sharon Veis, a speech-language pathologist at the Voice, Speech and Language Service and Swallowing Center of Northwestern University in Chicago. Veis says she doesn't mind being called a "speech therapist," but she and other speech professionals prefer the term used by the...

The answer is a resounding 'maybe'

posted on July 1, 2013 - 9:12am
Quest Vol. 20, No. 3
Ever wonder if your child with a neuromuscular disease would do better in a different learning environment, but don’t know what else is out there? One option may be a charter school — or maybe not. Charter schools are public schools

Specialists, support groups and stimulant medications help families cope with the unusual cognitive and personality effects of type 1 myotonic dystrophy

posted on September 1, 2008 - 2:27pm
QUEST Vol. 15, No. 5
*Many people interviewed for this article asked not to be identified to protect the privacy of affected family members. “Everybody knows the word apathy,” says a California woman whose 25-year-old daughter’s type 1 myotonic dystrophy (MMD1, sometimes called DM1) was diagnosed just a few years ago. “People use the word loosely. I don’t think it does justice to the reality of this disease.”
posted on April 1, 2009 - 3:08pm
QUEST Vol. 16, No. 2
Some students with muscle diseases have IEPs (Individualized Education Plans) and some have 504 plans. What’s the difference? Should parents be concerned if the school says their child doesn’t qualify for an IEP, and creates a 504 plan instead — or vice versa? Not necessarily. As the accompanying chart and diagram shows, there’s a lot of overlap between the two plans. The key is for parents to be...

Are learning disabilities part of the picture?

posted on January 1, 1997 - 11:30am
By the early 1990s, researchers began to see more than they had expected. The dystrophin gene wasn't just a muscle protein gene. There was also a brain form of dystrophin, made from the same gene, but in a slightly different way.

Skills for school and play

posted on November 1, 1999 - 5:00pm
ln vol. 6, no. 5, we described occupational therapy for adults ("Skills for the Job of Living"). This story looks at OT for children, whose "jobs" are different and whose developing brains need special attention. I think we were in a big denial," says Faith Varcadipane of Satellite Beach, Fla., when she talks about the first year of her son's life.
posted on June 1, 1996 - 1:28pm
Federal laws guarantee children with neuromuscular diseases an inclusive education in the public schools. Parents need to understand their rights and how the system works, so they can get the best program for their children. Special education refers to the instruction and related services provided to students with disabilities, including those with physical disabilities. For many years,...