relationships

They say 'three's a crowd,' but what if the third person is your personal care assistant? A psychologist with SMA offers some dating strategies.

posted on October 30, 2014 - 9:11am
“Samantha” is a typical 30-something single female who has a successful, fulfilling career in investment banking. Samantha also enjoys an active social life, but when she looks around her and sees friends and peers in romantic relationships, she can’t help but desire the same for herself.

Having a disability doesn’t mean you can’t find the love of your life; young adults with neuromuscular disease share their stories and advice

posted on February 14, 2012 - 11:54am
If you have limited movement, how do you make the first move on a date? Is it OK to bring a personal care attendant on a date? At what point would you let a "significant other" provide personal care for you?

Bill Beall and Gail Ableman, who each have Friedreich's ataxia, live independently thanks to 'the kind of love that can overcome challenges'

posted on October 1, 2011 - 2:39pm
QUEST Vol. 18, No. 4
Sharing a life together in Spokane, Wash., Bill Beall Jr. and Gail Ableman — who each use power wheelchairs due to Friedreich’s ataxia (FA) — spend much of their time working out to maintain their independence. MDA’s Quest magazine and a love of exercise brought them together — and their love of each other makes possible their continued independence.

Keeping the romance alive when your caregiver is your partner

posted on December 31, 2009 - 1:19am
QUEST Vol. 17, No. 1
According to the National Family Caregivers Association, more than 50 million Americans care for loved ones with a chronic illness, disability or old age. Caregivers assist people with neuromuscular disease in accomplishing many tasks of daily living. From eating to grooming, dressing to transferring, traveling to sleeping, and more, caregivers truly make life fully possible.
posted on January 1, 2008 - 10:11am
QUEST Vol. 15, No. 1
In this issue: A great cane ... and walker ** Loves digital Quest ** Living with SMA ** Glad to see McArdle disease.

Place your bets — it’s time to play

posted on March 1, 2007 - 10:27am
QUEST Vol. 14, No. 2
Dating. It’s a touchy subject — especially for people with disabilities. Which isn’t to say it should be avoided. Approached cautiously, with a strong sense of self-identity — yes. But never avoided. That way leads to living alone with 40 cats, all named Muffin. So, what can you do? Dating is a lot like playing poker. But instead of asking poker champ Phil Gordon for advice, here are some...