glycosylation

New understanding of how the alpha-dystroglycan protein is glycosylated (sugar-coated) may have relevance for treating some forms of congenital and limb-girdle muscular dystrophy

posted on August 13, 2013 - 3:19pm
Glycosylation — "sugar-coating" — of the muscle protein alpha-dystroglycan is known to be a crucial part of muscle function. Without sufficient glycosylation, alpha-dystroglycan doesn't stick well to other proteins, and an important linkage between muscle fibers and their surroundings is disrupted.

New understanding of how the alpha-dystroglycan protein is glycosylated (sugar-coated) may have relevance for treating some forms of congenital and limb-girdle muscular dystrophy

posted on August 13, 2013 - 3:19pm
Glycosylation — "sugar-coating" — of the muscle protein alpha-dystroglycan is known to be a crucial part of muscle function. Without sufficient glycosylation, alpha-dystroglycan doesn't stick well to other proteins, and an important linkage between muscle fibers and their surroundings is disrupted.

In this podcast from Nationwide Children’s Hospital, pediatric neurologist Francesco Muntoni describes how current understanding of CMD is creating opportunities for therapy development

posted on October 15, 2012 - 5:00am
Editor's note (Oct. 19, 2012): This story was updated to reflect the fact that Kevin Flanigan co-directs the MDA Clinic at Nationwide Children's Hospital in Columbus, Ohio.

Investigators have developed lab mice likely to advance understanding of the fukutin-deficient disorders Fukuyama congenital muscular dystrophy and type 2M limb-girdle muscular dystrophy

posted on October 9, 2012 - 5:00am
By disrupting the fukutin gene at different time points in mice embryo, researchers have been able to develop research models of two types of human muscle disease: Fukuyama congenital muscular dystrophy (Fukuyama CMD)  and type 2M limb-girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD2M).