dysphagia

posted on October 1, 2009 - 3:29pm
During the holidays, eating is as much about friends and family as it is about food. But when muscle weakness makes it difficult or impossible to eat by mouth, some shy away from coming to the table. Nonsense, say those who’ve learned how to work around — or ignore — the social discomfort. Life’s too short to miss out on the fun. Below are adapted dining tips from therapists and people with weak...
posted on January 1, 2011 - 11:22am
QUEST Vol. 18, No. 1
As featured in More Make It Fast, Cook It Slow by Stephanie O'Dea, Hyperion, 2010 Serves 2 to 4 Ingredients aluminum foil 2 tilapia fillets 1 teaspoon dried ginger ½ teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes 1 tablespoon gluten-free soy sauce 2 green onions, sliced 2 bunches bok choy, coarsely chopped Directions Use a 6-quart slow cooker.
posted on January 1, 2011 - 10:15am
QUEST Vol. 18, No. 1
As featured in 1,001 Best Slow-Cooker Recipes by Sue Spitler, Surrey Books, 2008 Serves 4 Ingredients One tablespoon peanut butter and ¼-½ teaspoon crushed red pepper can be substituted for the Thai peanut sauce.
posted on January 1, 2011 - 9:05am
QUEST Vol. 18, No. 1
As featured in 1,001 Best Slow-Cooker Recipes by Sue Spitler, Surrey Books, 2008 Serves 6 Ingredients Poblano chilies range from mild to very hot in flavor, so taste a tiny bit before using.  If the chili is very hot, you may want to use less or substitute some sweet green bell pepper.
posted on October 1, 2009 - 3:29pm
QUEST Vol. 16, No. 4
During the holidays, eating is as much about friends and family as it is about food. But when muscle weakness makes it difficult or impossible to eat by mouth, some shy away from coming to the table. Nonsense, say those who’ve learned how to work around — or ignore — the social discomfort. Life’s too short to miss out on the fun. Below are adapted dining tips from therapists and people with weak...
posted on October 1, 2009 - 3:27pm
QUEST Vol. 16, No. 4
Ken Lang’s OPMD symptoms began with swallowing problems, when he was about 50. “They were fairly mild at first,” he says. “There were certain foods I could no longer eat,” such as rice and ground beef. “I couldn’t eat a hamburger. I couldn’t swallow it. It would get stuck. I’d have to cough it up, or I’d feel a sensation of choking. Over the course of time, the symptoms got a little worse, and my...
posted on October 1, 2009 - 3:18pm
QUEST Vol. 16, No. 4
Starting with the tongue and moving down the throat and into the esophagus are a series of muscles that constrict and push food from the mouth to the stomach. The tongue and throat muscles weaken severely in OPMD, leading to choking, inhaling food into the lungs (“aspiration”) and lung infections (pneumonia). Speaking also can be adversely affected by weakening tongue and throat muscles. 
posted on August 1, 1999 - 12:56pm
If you've ever gulped a cup of coffee while simultaneously searching for car keys, packing lunch for a 5-year-old and giving directions over the phone, you probably didn't notice that a miracle was occurring literally underneath your nose. Swallowing is a seemingly simple but extraordinary act, one we usually take for granted at least until something goes wrong with the process.