curved spine

Setting the record straight

posted on January 1, 1997 - 12:24pm
"I've had a lot of different surgeries for a lot of different problems," says Todd Palkowski of Franklin, Wis. "Not all of them have been successful. But this one works."
posted on August 1, 2002 - 2:40pm
Surgery to correct scoliosis not only changes a person's body contours but may also necessitate changes in equipment. Larry Sandler is a wheelchair specialist at Chesapeake Rehab Equipment in Baltimore who's had a lot of experience helping people obtain and learn to use new equipment after scoliosis surgery. Jason Abramowitz is one of his clients and a good example of the kinds of challenges...

Staying ahead of the curve

posted on August 1, 2002 - 1:46pm
You hope it won't be necessary, but it often is: surgery to correct scoliosis, a lateral (side-to-side) curvature of the spine. Scoliosis can occur in almost any neuromuscular condition in which back muscles, which normally keep the spine straight, weaken, but it's particularly common in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and spinal muscular atrophy (SMA).

Setting the record straight

posted on January 1, 1997 - 12:24pm
"I've had a lot of different surgeries for a lot of different problems," says Todd Palkowski of Franklin, Wis. "Not all of them have been successful. But this one works."