Adrian Krainer

Isis Pharmaceuticals has launched a trial to test multiple doses of its experimental antisense drug ISIS-SMNRx in 24 children with SMA at four US centers

posted on November 15, 2012 - 2:45pm
Update (Nov. 22, 2013): In a Nov. 22, 2013, press release, Isis Pharmaceuticals announced it would investigate a higher dose of ISIS-SMNRx in children with SMA than originally planned. It will add a 12-milligram cohort to the ongoing phase 1b/2a study.

Experiments in SMA mice suggest that antisense treatment is most effective when it reaches all body tissues, not just the central nervous system

posted on October 4, 2011 - 2:11pm
Treatment of a mouse model of severe spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) with an antisense oligonucleotide results in greater and longer-lasting benefit when given systemically than when given only to the central nervous system, new research shows.

Mice with a severe SMA-like disease that were injected with a synthetic "antisense" molecule developed bigger, more structurally sound muscles than untreated mice

posted on March 15, 2011 - 1:31pm
A team of research scientists has found that mice with a disease resembling a severe form of spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) that were treated with a gene-modifying molecule produced more of a needed protein throughout their spinal cords; developed bigger, stronger muscles; and survived longer than expected. 

Researchers have identified a compound that helps cells produce more full-length SMN protein from the backup SMN2 gene.

posted on November 6, 2009 - 1:19pm
Scientists have identified a chemical cousin of the commonly used antibiotic tetracycline that has the potential to be refined and modified into a therapy for spinal muscular atrophy (SMA). PTK-SMA1 works by correcting an error in a cellular process called RNA splicing, and leads to increased production of a critical protein that is deficient in this disease.

A variant in the SMN2 gene leads to more full-length SMN protein and better function

posted on September 29, 2009 - 1:34pm
Scientists have uncovered a variant (mutation) in the SMN2 gene that leads to production of more full-length SMN protein molecules and a milder version of spinal muscular atrophy (SMA). The finding, a naturally occurring point mutation (a single letter change in the DNA code) in this gene, has immediate implications for genetic testing and possible long-term implications for therapy development.

 A variant in the SMN2 gene leads to more full-length SMN protein and better function

posted on September 29, 2009 - 10:46am
Scientists have uncovered a variant (mutation) in the SMN2 gene that leads to production of more full-length SMN protein molecules and a milder version of spinal muscular atrophy (SMA). The finding, a naturally occurring point mutation (a single letter change in the DNA code) in this gene, has immediate implications for genetic testing and possible long-term implications for therapy development.