Hypokalemic Periodic Paralysis PP1

Stanford University is collecting samples of blood, muscle and other tissues from people with neuromuscular disorders for use in research

posted on January 7, 2015 - 12:06pm
Ever wondered how someone with a neuromuscular disorder in his or her family might contribute to research efforts in this field?

The pace of research can seem unreasonably slow; here are a few reasons why

posted on January 1, 2012 - 3:11pm
QUEST Vol. 19, No. 1
John Porter from the National Institutes of Health likes to start talks by noting, “It’s a great time to be a mouse with a neuromuscular disease.” Exciting research results are regularly reported, where a treatment appears to cure one neuromuscular disease or another in a mouse — yet there are few treatments available today for people with any of these diseases, and only a few treatments in human...

MDA-supported researchers have developed a mouse with a mutation in a muscle sodium channel and a disease that mimics human hypokalemic PP

posted on October 14, 2011 - 10:15am
MDA grantee Stephen Cannon at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas coordinated a study team that has developed a mouse model of one type of hypokalemic periodic paralysis, publishing the development in the Oct. 3, 2011, issue of the Journal of Clinical Investigation.

A phase 3 trial of the drug dichlorphenamide in hyperkalemic and hypokalemic periodic paralysis is open at several U.S. and European centers

posted on October 14, 2011 - 10:13am
A multicenter study of the drug dichlorphenamide in 140 adults with hyperkalemic or hypokalemic periodic paralysis is open at sites in California, Kansas, Massachusetts, Minnesota, Missouri, New York, Ohio and Texas, as well as in France (not yet recruiting), Italy and the United Kingdom. 

Research items about Friedreich's ataxia, myasthenia gravis, mitochondrial myopathies, type 1 myotonic dystrophy, gene therapy and gene modification

posted on July 7, 2011 - 10:28am
Edison drugs target FA, mitochondrial diseases

The biggest problem at an ER may not be the one you go in with, but the one you encounter there

posted on July 1, 2011 - 4:18pm
QUEST Vol. 18, No. 3
When a medical emergency strikes — and the patient is a person with a neuromuscular disease — it’s not just getting to the emergency room quickly that’s critical. It’s also critical to ensure the ER staff understands the patient’s special needs caused by muscle disease.

Frequently asked questions about cardiac problems in neuromuscular disease

posted on June 1, 1999 - 5:00pm
Part 1 of this series (Quest, Vol. 6, No. 2) addressed cardiomyopathy, the degeneration of heart muscle that often occurs in many neuromuscular diseases.