Dating and Friendship

They say 'three's a crowd,' but what if the third person is your personal care assistant? A psychologist with SMA offers some dating strategies.

posted on October 30, 2014 - 9:11am
“Samantha” is a typical 30-something single female who has a successful, fulfilling career in investment banking. Samantha also enjoys an active social life, but when she looks around her and sees friends and peers in romantic relationships, she can’t help but desire the same for herself.

Two couples affected by Becker muscular dystrophy discuss the challenges and joys of making a relationship work when one partner has a chronic disease

posted on November 19, 2013 - 11:05am
Quest Vol. 20, No. 4
After nine years of courtship, my partner Richard and I are discussing The Future. Children, marriage and home ownership are now notching out deeper spaces in our daily dialogue. Like many couples, we’re both scared of The Future. We’re concerned we won’t be fully equipped for what may come — those ripples that may make life a little more difficult. We’ve already experienced hardships that we’ve...

Having a disability doesn’t mean you can’t find the love of your life; young adults with neuromuscular disease share their stories and advice

posted on February 14, 2012 - 11:54am
If you have limited movement, how do you make the first move on a date? Is it OK to bring a personal care attendant on a date? At what point would you let a "significant other" provide personal care for you?

Bill Beall and Gail Ableman, who each have Friedreich's ataxia, live independently thanks to 'the kind of love that can overcome challenges'

posted on October 1, 2011 - 2:39pm
QUEST Vol. 18, No. 4
Sharing a life together in Spokane, Wash., Bill Beall Jr. and Gail Ableman — who each use power wheelchairs due to Friedreich’s ataxia (FA) — spend much of their time working out to maintain their independence. MDA’s Quest magazine and a love of exercise brought them together — and their love of each other makes possible their continued independence.

Get those cameras ready! MDA is seeking Make-a-Muscle pix and photos of accessibility makeovers

posted on July 28, 2011 - 10:33am
This summer, MDA is inviting everyone to participate in its new "Make a Muscle, Make a Difference" public awareness campaign by submitting photos of friends and family flexing their muscles for MDA. MDA also is seeking photos for its "Accessible Spaces Gallery" debuting in August on the MDA Transitions Resource Center, a website designed to help young people with muscle diseases make the...

Tech-savvy Girl Scouts designed and built an award-winning wheelchair backup camera for friends with SMA

posted on May 25, 2011 - 12:18pm
Ten-year-old Quinn Schnitzlein has been using a power chair since he was 3, so he’s a pretty good driver. But the boy from Marietta, Ga., who has spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), often bumped into things when he backed up. One day last year, Quinn and some friends were at a fast-food restaurant. “We were at different tables,” Quinn says, “and when I’d try to turn around to talk to them, I kept...

My body may be confined mostly to one point in physical space, but my mind looks forward to its weekends in cyberspace

posted on March 31, 2011 - 11:45am
QUEST Vol. 18, No. 2
When I graduated from high school in 1984, there were no tearful farewells to friends and girlfriends while a New Wave soundtrack played in the background like some John Hughes movie. Frankly, I was relieved to be free to start my writing career, and hopefully be heralded as the next William Gibson. When my science fiction failed to sell, I switched to writing thrillers and, consequently, hoped...
posted on January 1, 2011 - 3:58pm
QUEST Vol. 18, No. 1
Growing up, Nygel Lenz was a typical active boy. He played football, soccer, basketball and baseball, and loved doing tricks like jumping ramps with his bike and skateboard. He learned he had scoliosis at age 11, but his life didn’t really change — until he had surgery for the condition at age 15. His balance worsened immediately, and he began seeing a neurologist, but it took almost four years...