Education

For many young adults with neuromuscular disease, the challenges and rewards of college offer a steppingstone to greater independence

posted on July 14, 2015 - 3:23pm
“I was already signed up for Duke, and was wait-listed for Yale, but waiting for Harvard. When I opened the Harvard letter, I got the shock of my life, and that was it!” says 17-year-old Caroline Zheng on being accepted to her dream school, Harvard, where she’ll start classes in the fall.

Before deciding on a homeschooled or homebound program for your child, educate yourself

posted on February 1, 2002 - 1:08pm
For many parents of children with neuromuscular diseases, a question arises at some point: Should I continue to send my child to school?
posted on February 1, 2001 - 7:34pm
If you thought school was a challenge when you were a student, just wait until you see how difficult it can be to approach the school as a parent. And for the parents of children with disabilities, getting your child the best available education is — like everything else — quite a bit more complicated. You'll have to be your child's advocate to ensure that the local school is prepared to meet...

Skills for school and play

posted on November 1, 1999 - 5:00pm
ln vol. 6, no. 5, we described occupational therapy for adults ("Skills for the Job of Living"). This story looks at OT for children, whose "jobs" are different and whose developing brains need special attention. I think we were in a big denial," says Faith Varcadipane of Satellite Beach, Fla., when she talks about the first year of her son's life.