Learning Disabilities

The answer is a resounding 'maybe'

posted on July 1, 2013 - 9:12am
Ever wonder if your child with a neuromuscular disease would do better in a different learning environment, but don’t know what else is out there? One option may be a charter school — or maybe not. Charter schools are public schools


posted on December 1, 2002 - 12:34pm
Parents of kids with neuromuscular diseases may be preparing to deal with their children’s progressive physical limitations, only to find they also have to cope with cognitive deficits. In other cases, cognitive difficulties are the first symptoms of the child’s neuromuscular disease. In either case, when a neuromuscular disease affects the brain, a new level of care and attention is required...
posted on February 1, 2002 - 4:42pm
A stress reliever Spencer Robedeaux, 12, seventh grade, Lancaster, Calif., Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) Jenny Robedeaux wasn't sure she wanted to educate her son Spencer at home, but he insisted. Both mother and son have CMT, and Spencer also has diagnoses of attention deficit disorder (ADD), migraine headaches and depression.
posted on February 1, 2002 - 4:15pm
Unusual lives, unusual answers Kari Ginther, 19, college student, Raymond, Wash., Friedreich's ataxia (FA) Kari has experienced both homeschooling and homebound education. Her homebound experience was at the bottom of the scale, especially when compared to the two years she spent being homeschooled by her mother, Beth.

Before deciding on a homeschooled or homebound program for your child, educate yourself

posted on February 1, 2002 - 1:08pm
For many parents of children with neuromuscular diseases, a question arises at some point: Should I continue to send my child to school?
posted on February 1, 2001 - 3:10pm
"People always think speech therapy is related to speech and not to assistive technology or swallowing disorders," says Sharon Veis, a speech-language pathologist at the Voice, Speech and Language Service and Swallowing Center of Northwestern University in Chicago. Veis says she doesn't mind being called a "speech therapist," but she and other speech professionals prefer the term used by the...

Skills for school and play

posted on November 1, 1999 - 5:00pm
ln vol. 6, no. 5, we described occupational therapy for adults ("Skills for the Job of Living"). This story looks at OT for children, whose "jobs" are different and whose developing brains need special attention. I think we were in a big denial," says Faith Varcadipane of Satellite Beach, Fla., when she talks about the first year of her son's life.

Are learning disabilities part of the picture?

posted on January 1, 1997 - 11:30am
By the early 1990s, researchers began to see more than they had expected. The dystrophin gene wasn't just a muscle protein gene. There was also a brain form of dystrophin, made from the same gene, but in a slightly different way.